Home Theater Raspberry Pi


Enclosure - Raspberry Pi by SparkFunElectronics

Enclosure – Raspberry Pi by SparkFunElectronics

So in Part One, we took an old external had drive, and added it as storage to a Raspberry Pi.  In Part Two, we took that Raspberry Pi and shared the new folders on the local network.  In this final tutorial, I’ll show what all of this has been for, and show you how to create your own Home Theater Raspberry Pi.

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How to Share a Folder on Raspberry Pi


File Folders by One Way Stock

File Folders by One Way Stock

In part one of our tutorial, we discussed how to mount an external hard drive or USB drive on to our Raspberry Pi (or any other Linux based) computer. In this tutorial we will discuss how to share folders from that computer to your local network. I am doing this so I can share the media files I have on my external hard drive, and access them from many places on my network, such as my laptop, my android phone, and my Raspberry Pi running XBMC. You can use this tutorial to share files in a similar way.

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How to Mount USB Disks on Raspberry Pi


Hard disk dissection by Roberto F.

Hard disk dissection by Roberto F.

I’ve got a Raspberry Pi, and I’ve got an old external hard drive. So what can I do with them? I decided I was going to create a networked shared drive from them, so in this first tutorial, I will show you how to mount the drive on a Linux operating system.  Doing this is easy, but can get a little tricky when you attach and remove drives on the fly.

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Automatically Unmount Network Shares on Ubuntu


Hard disk dissection

Hard disk dissection

I’ve mentioned before, how I mount shared drives in Ubuntu both at home and at work.  While this is quite useful, it seems the default setup for Ubuntu stops the network interface before disconnecting these drives.  This results in Ubuntu hanging for a while on shutdown while these drives time out.  After the jump we describe how to solve this problem.

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How to change date formats on Ubuntu


The Date Stamp

The Date Stamp

In order to change the system date format on Ubuntu, you need to know a little about where the date format is coming from.  Regional settings, such as date and time formats, as well as language, sort order, etc. are specified in files called locales.  A locale contains the rules specifying how dates and times are formatted, amongst other settings.

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How To Install GlassFish on Windows


1. Download GlassFish

Download the installation jar for GlassFish. I went with GlassFish V2, since this is the latest stable release, though I think this technique will work with any version listed on the download page.

2. Install it

The GlassFish V2 Installation instructions show how to install it once download is complete. The problem with the GlassFish installer is that it does not register as a service with Windows, so once you log out, the GlassFish instance will terminate.

3. Register as a Service.

There are a few ways of doing this. The Hard Way, or my favourite the Easy Way. Once the service is registered, GlassFish will continue to run once you log out, and can be controlled through the Services applet from Control Panel, though continued use of asadmin is recommended.

Alternatively, use Ubuntu, where you can install GlassFish as easy as:

sudo apt-get install glassfish

Ubuntu wins again :-)

Serial Port Jiggery-Pokery


How to enable and disable serial ports on Ubuntu

Today, I had to fix a bug in some software I’m working on. The details of the bug aren’t that important, apart from the fact that the bug only became apparent when the software was run on a system with one or less serial ports.

Since I’m debugging on Ubuntu, and I have two serial ports (/dev/ttyS0 and /dev/ttyS1), I needed to find a way to temporarily disable one. This is how I achieved it.

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Restore Default Ubuntu Groups.


While this affected me on Ubuntu, I guess it’s possible that other Linux distros will also be affected. Though the incorrect use of usermod, I managed to screw up my groups configuration leaving me without sudo or su ability, which is obviously important on Ubuntu to make system configuration changes. Read on for the whole story of how I recovered, and restored correct groups again.

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